Archive for August, 2013


Full moon captured at sunrise over Nightcliff Jetty, Northern Territory  by L Denton.

Source: BoM Facebook

 

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Right, whack this place on the bucket list post-haste!

Source: Being Indonesian

 

Source: unknown (I’m pretty sure it’s nearly as old as the internet)

The Fort of São João Baptista das Berlengas is located off western coast of Portugal, on the largest island of the archipelago of the Berlengas. Built from 1502 onwards, the fortification belonged to a group of defensive military structures meant to protect the municipality located on the coast.

Looks like something from Myst…

Source: Wikipedia

This picture blew my mind a little when I first saw it a few years ago. I’ve never been very good at visualising weights but with the guy in the photo for reference the sheer size some tuna can reach was seriously brought home to me! If I remember correctly these fish were caught off ?New England with the larger of the two (I think its a Bluefin) weighing in at around 500lb.
Check out the groove down its side- the pectoral fins recess along it and lie completely flat to the body for ultimate streamlining.

 

Look at the size of those operculums! LOOK AT THEM! Those gills have to be massive to keep a fish that big adequately powered at high speed.

Source: unknown (I’m pretty sure I got these pics from some fishing forum. If anyone has the full story on them please let me know!)

Source: unknown

The very odd Oarfish

So long it takes up four photos…

Source: unknown

Whale shark with a group of remora, Darwin’s Arch, Galapagos Islands.

Source: FabWeb

When scallops attack

Scallops are actually highly mobile and will actively hunt prey.

Source: Unknown

The tip of a spiral shell has broken off and become a grain of sand. It is opalescent from the repeated tumbling action of the surf. Surrounding the shell fragment are five other sand grains, from top middle clockwise, (1) a pink shell fragment, (2) a foram, (3) a microscopic shell, (4) a volcanic melt, and (5) a bit of coral.

Source: Geology.com (Link has a bunch of different sands and their compositions, really interesting and beautiful!

One of the more strange-looking animals we came across in Veatch Canyon, a bathysaurus. These fish use their lower jaw to scoop in the sand.

Source: NOAA Okeanos Explorer Program, 2013 Northeast U.S. Canyons Expedition

Photo submitted to the Lost Newcastle Facebook page by M. Mckean with the caption: “Marlin tied on to the front of cars and being taken to the ice works, prior to being sent to the Australian Museum. Shoal Bay. Date unknown.  From the archives of Athel D’Obrain, Newcastle University.  I love the guy strapping in his Marlin in the background.  Is there a better fishing photo than this ?”

Interesting comments from other locals:

K. Davey: “I imagine that this might be Athol’s car, since he isn’t in the shot. If it was someone else’s car, the fisherman would surely have been included in the shot.”
P. Hall: “I reckon early 50’s…”
T. Durrance: ” I think Athel landed the 1st black marlin off the bay in 1938 or 39 there is a plaque in Shoal Bay. Then marlin fishing stopped throughout the war yeas and did not really come back until the late 50’s.”
S. Shelley: ” Darks Ice Works on Wharf Road, another memory of Newcastle.  My dad delighted in calling it Dikes Arse Works ( he was wicked).”
T. Durrance: “My grandfather had a room in the ice works for putting in his marlin and other fish caught .Granddad fished the bay throughout the 1950’s & 60’s a foundation member of the Newcastle Port Stephens Game fishing club.”
A. Hodge: “The car is a1939 V8 Mercury”
T. Durrance: “It was how they studied nature back then that Black Marlin would be close to 2yrs old and about 70kg”… ” It wasn’t until the 1970’s that we started the world first tagging program of game fish. I think it is fair to say that most of these smaller marlin would have been eaten as they are pretty good on the plate”

Source: Lost Newcastle Facebook page

Nerodia sipedon, a Northern Watersnake

Source: Reddit

Osprey s living the new high lifeA company has gone to unusual lengths to protect a nest of osprey chicks which made a home on a moored barge in the Pilbara.

Marine and Civil staff built a special platform for the birds after discovering two chicks on the moveable support legs of the barge at Point Samson boat harbour.

The company carried out a carefully-planned, 45-minute operation with Pilbara Wildlife Carers to move the chicks to the platform.

The move appeared to be successful with the parent ospreys returning to the area 20 minutes later.

 

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